What is a gose?

We currently have Ale Industries “Gose Ride the Whip” on tap at Aisle 5. It’s of the “gose” (pronounced goes-uh) variety. These are sour, almost salty styles of beer that originated in Germany. “Gose Ride the Whip” rolls in at 4.4% ABV, and fans of sour beers will certainly enjoy its lemony bite. Ale Industries is based in Oakland, so come on by to try some home-grown beer before it’s all gone!


If you like IPAs...

If you like India Pale Ales, we’ve got you covered at Aisle 5. No, this style was not invented in India, as the name may seem to indicate. Its name stems from Imperial Britain. The British love their beer, and, during their colonial days, they needed beer shipped to all their outposts around the world. Back then beer did not travel well. However more aggressively-hopped beers seemed to fare better on the long sea voyages. And so these beers became popular with the British clientele and traders in India, and the beverages were named as such.Right now we have five different IPAs on draft at Aisle 5. A current staff favorite is HenHouse Brewing Company Phantom Time, clocking in at 6.3% ABV. Come by to try it (andthe other four)!


A brief profile on two hops

Today we briefly profile two hops used in one of our draft beers. The Alpine Brewing Company Duet a longtime staff favorite, uses two hops: Amarillo and Simcoe.

Amarillo hops are commonly used for aroma. They give off a citrus scent, moreso along grapefruit lines, and can be quite pungent.

Simcoe hops are very popular with both home and craft brewers. It’s a diverse variety, and can be used to brew any kind of IPA variety. Simcoe blesses us with woody, musky and citrusy notes.

The Alpine Duet offers a blast of resinous aromatics with notes of evergreen pine, orange zest, and hints of cedar. Big hoppy flavors mingle with geranial notes, while hints of citrus fruit and an overall lingering piney quality lend a touch of complexity to an otherwise simple and delicious IPA


What makes a sour beer tart?

It’s all in the bacteria and yeast that the brewer decides to go with. Some common wild yeast strains you’ll find in sours are Lactobacillus, Acetobacter and Brettanomyces. They all bring different flavors forward. Lactobacillus has a yogurt tang to it, Acetobacter has a bitterness more akin to that of a vinegar, and Brettanomyces wafts with an earthy aroma. We’ve currently got Cali Craft’s Sour Zinfandel brew on tap at Aisle 5. As part of their wine barrel project, this sour is brewed with Brettanomyces and wild wine yeasts. We’ll soon tap Barebottle’s Sacred Tart, which gets its tartness from the Lactobacillus strain.


What makes it a Kolsch?

The name comes from the beer’s origins in Cologne, Germany. It is unique because when it was first brewed in the early 20th century, most beers in Germany were bottom-fermented beers (see: lagers). Kolschs are top- and warm-fermented, and then conditioned by lagering at colder temperatures. So a kolsch is technically an ale, but tastes very similar to German lagers. We’ve got Pine Street Brewery Free City Kolsch currently pouring at Aisle 5. If you like lagers, come by to try it out!


The difference between ales and lagers

And now for perhaps the most basic lesson when it comes to beer: What’s the difference between ales and lagers? Ales are the veterans of the beer game; they’ve been around for thousands of years. Lagers are newbies, only around for possibly hundreds of years, though they’ve certainly made a name for themselves. The most basic difference comes from the yeast. Ales use “top-fermenting” yeasts, whereas lagers use “bottom-fermenting” strains. An article from Popular Science breaks down the difference in greater detail here. Lagers are usually described as “crisp,” and almost all of the major commercial beer brands (Budweiser, Heineken, Coors, etc.) are lagers. Ales are much more versatile, and oftentimes are described as hoppy or bitter. Social Kitchen & Brewery MR. KITE’S is an excellent example of an English-style pale Ale with tasting notes of dried apricot, honey, nuts. Taste the differences for yourself at Aisle 5 today!

social@aisle5oakland.com

Aisle 5 Oakland